Babies in the Womb Feel Pain: Please Support A3452/S2026, the NJ Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act

twenty week baby

 

There is substantial medical evidence that babies in the womb feel pain at a very early stage of gestation.  Thanks to advances in medicine, babies as young as 20 weeks post-fertilization can survive and thrive with appropriate care and treatment.  Experts in the field of Maternal-Fetal medicine routinely administer pain medication as standard medical practice because they recognize these babies as patients. There have been many instances of babies who survived abortions who were left to die or killed by abortionists.  We have to look no further than the Gosnell case in Pennsylvania.

The Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act will protect babies in the womb at 20 weeks and older who are capable of feeling pain and ensure that babies born alive during an abortion will be given the same proper life saving medical care given to premature infants.  Babies in the womb experience excruciating pain during an abortion.  A recent video from a former abortion provider, Dr. Anthony Levatino, explains how these abortions are done in this video  (Warning:  viewing content may be disturbing for some.)

Take Action Now!

We are happy to report that A3452/S2026, the NJ Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act has been introduced in the NJ Legislature.  We thank the sponsors of this bill for recognizing the horrific practices of the abortion industry, who callously and with depraved indifference to human life, brutally and routinely end the lives of innocent babies in the womb and endanger the lives of women.  This bill is modeled after H.R. 36, the Federal bill by the same name. Passing this legislation is part of the 2020 Project, a collaborative effort by pro-life groups in NJ to protect pain capable babies.  For more information on this initiative, please visit www.babiesinthewombfeelpain.com

Please go to the www.njrtl.org Legislation page and Take Action here on this legislation. It’s time we protect babies in the womb capable of feeling pain.

What do medical experts say about whether babies in the womb feel pain?

We are obligated to protect the undefensible,” stated Dr. Colleen A. Malloy, who teaches in the Neonatology division at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Testifying before the United States Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, March 15, 2016,  Dr. Malloy said that advances in technology show the “viability” of human life at an earlier age than previously believed.

A child definitely feels pain at 20 weeks, testified Dr. Malloy, and it is certainly “viable.” Because of technological advancements “we have pushed back the gestational age” of when an unborn child “can be resuscitated and resuscitated successfully,” she said.

These children “are moving, reacting, and developing right before our eyes in the neonatal intensive care unit,” she said.

A June 2009 study of over 300,000 babies by the American Medical Association found that, among children aged 20 to 24 weeks post-conception, they had a steadily higher chance of survival with each passing week, ranging from 10 percent at the beginning to 85 percent at the end.

“Given these survival numbers, the NICU commonly cares for infants born in this gestational age range. We can easily witness their humanity, as well as their experiences with pain,” she testified.

The standard of care for NICUs requires attention to and treatment of neonatal pain,” she said. “There is no reason to believe that a born infant will feel pain any differently than that same infant if he or she were still in utero.”

“I could never imagine subjecting my tiny patients to a horrific procedure such as those that involve limb detachment or cardiac injection.”

Dr. Kathi Aultman, a retired gynecologist, said she had performed both first and second trimester abortions, had an abortion herself, and has a cousin who is an abortion survivor.

After performing second-trimester abortions, she recounted how she had to examine the remains of the unborn child and found “perfectly-formed organs.” While she worked in the neonatal intensive care unit by day and in an abortion clinic by night, her conscience began to be troubled by the fact that she was intent on saving babies in the NICU who were the same age as those being aborted in the clinic.

 

Lack of safeguards worries advocates and opponents on both sides of suicide debate

, Des Moines Register 7:02 a.m. CST November 25, 2016

Betsy Davis was too weak to kill herself.

So when it came time to end her life under a new California law for the terminally ill, her caregivers propped her up and held the cup as she drank a fatal mix of prescription drugs.

But physical assistance in taking the toxic medications is illegal, multiple experts contend.

Davis, a 41-year-old artist, suffered from Lou Gehrig’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The complications she experienced in taking her life while trying to comply with California’s assisted-suicide law are far from unique, a Des Moines Register investigation of assisted suicides around the nation found.

Such complications also offer reason to reconsider or adjust “right to die” efforts in Iowa, say both proponents and opponents of such a law here.

“This story and this data should give all Iowans reason to pause and to ask ourselves: Is this really the path we want to go down,” said Jenifer Bowen, executive director of Iowa Right to Life, a group that is most commonly known for its fight against abortion but that also opposes assisted suicide.

The Register this year launched a review of national data on assisted suicide in other states, prompted by renewed political debate over efforts to make Iowa the seventh state to allow doctor-assisted suicide for terminally ill patients.

But records on hundreds of deaths in the six states that allow physician-assisted suicide are nonexistent or incomplete. That makes it impossible to decipher whether applicable state law was followed or if vulnerable patients suffered unintended consequences, the Register found.

“Assisted suicide is nearly untraceable. There is minimal reporting and tracking,” said Marilyn Golden, a senior policy analyst for the Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund in California. “It almost appears as if the practice of assisted suicide has deliberately been made secretive, all with the claim of patient confidentiality.”

Among the 1,642 documented assisted suicides in Oregon and Washington since the states began reporting statistics in 1998 and 2009, respectively, the Register found:

  • COMPLICATIONS: At least 38 people (about 2.5 percent) experienced complications as they were dying, including regurgitation of the fatal medicine, seizures or waking up after taking the medication.
  • INCOMPLETE RECORDS: At least 478 deaths occurred without record of key details, such as whether complications occurred. At least 203 people have died without a record of whether the deaths were from ingesting medication or from natural causes.
  • PROLONGED DEATHS: In 2009, a person in Oregon took more than four days to die after taking the medication. Of the two states, Washington had the most complete data. For deaths where time was recorded, 17 percent took 91 or more minutes. In Oregon, the median time before death in 2015 was 25 minutes.
  • NO DATA: Two of the states where assisted suicide is an option — Vermont and Montana — do not track deaths at all. Data from California and Colorado, the most recent states to legalize assisted suicide, is not yet available.

Golden argues for ending legalized assisted suicide based, in part, on the data. But others warn the information should instead be used to rally for better laws. That camp includes Jennifer Holm, a 46-year-old Ankeny mother with multiple terminal illnesses.

Holm has been one of Iowa’s most outspoken advocates for assisted suicide. She says the data tell her that doctors should be allowed not only to prescribe the lethal drugs but to administer them as well, to help avoid complications.

“I know there are a lot of people who say, ‘That becomes a slippery slope,’ but that’s just not true,” Holm said, pushing back against critics who contend the physical act of a doctor’s assistance would lead to unsolicited euthanasia.

Struggling to die with her failing strength

Davis’ suicide became a team effort by sheer necessity.

“I didn’t know what to do,” said Heather Okray, Davis’ caregiver for two years who helped steady Davis’ hand as she drank the fatal mixture of medication and coconut gelatin. “They give us this completely absurd time limit you have to down your liquid in. And for an ALS patient — that I know every day can’t drink that much — we were looking for a Hail Mary there.”

Her withering body and what it meant to comply with the new law were very much on Betsy’s mind in her final weeks. “I’ve been meeting with doctors, and filing paperwork, and, well, this is my window,” she wrote to friends in an email. “I have just enough strength in my arm to self-administer the drug.”

But Betsy, one of the first patients approved under California’s End of Life Option Act, ended up needing more help than expected. According to her sister, a doctor at the scene told the group it was OK, but she declined to identify the doctor.

The California Board of Medicine and other experts consider that help illegal.

“At that point, our understanding of the law was that we couldn’t assist her,” Kelly said. “But we knew that no one was going to come and arrest — no one was going to get in trouble. But it was still just this kind of concern.”

Disputed meaning of ‘self-administer’

Kelly and Okray, Betsy’s caregiver, were left with a lingering question: Is there an easier way to do this?

Suffering from ALS, Betsy typifies patients in the end stages of a particularly scary, ruthless disease that leaves them powerless. Many advocates of assisted-suicide laws would consider somebody like her in desperate need of such an option. Yet the very law intended to help such patients is written so that it might exclude her.

And the family was unable to obtain secobarbital, a drug commonly used in assisted suicides. Secobarbital sodium is the most commonly prescribed drug in assisted suicides and widely considered to be the most effective. But Betsy, faced with a local shortage of the drug, was unable to attain it in time for her own suicide.

So instead, friends and family devised a plan to make a gelatin concoction to help make the morphine, chloral hydrate and phenobarbital more palatable.

“I think out of all of this, that’s what makes me upset,” Okray said, “is watching somebody die like that and knowing there was an easier solution to it.”

Kelly said she also was troubled by the legal gray area: Had they violated the “self-administer” clause of California’s law?

The law defines “self-administer” as the “physical act of administering and ingesting the aid-in-dying drug to bring about his or her own death.”

Kelly said she was reassured to learn, after consulting with the organization Compassion & Choices, that “taking the medication needs to be a conscious, affirmative act on the part of the patient.”

“That doesn’t mean they couldn’t hold a cup that a person is drinking out of,” said Matt Whitaker, state director in California of the organization, which supports assisted-suicide laws. “That would be fine.”

A spokeswoman for the Medical Board of California referred to her organization’s analysis of the law, which, in its view, “permits a person who is present to prepare the aid-in-dying drug (but not assist in the ingesting of the drug) without civil or criminal liability.”

Groups like the Life Legal Defense Foundation, which has challenged California’s law, believe physical assistance is illegal.

Claire Marblestone, an attorney with the Foley & Lardner firm in Los Angeles, specializes in health care law and regulation. She and a colleague wrote about key requirements of the California law for the National Law Review.

The law’s requirements that patients “self-administer,” Marblestone said, is “a little bit untested.”

“It’s a very touchy subject with a lot of potential areas for gray,” she said.

What it could all mean in Iowa

California’s legal gray area now spreads to Colorado and may have consequences in Iowa as such laws reach further across the country.

Iowa Poll results in March showed 59 percent of Iowans favor allowing the terminally ill to end their own lives. That included a slim majority of Republicans (51 percent).

Iowa Republicans, including Gov. Terry Branstad, have not thus far supported physician-assisted suicide. But Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, noted the effort has seen bipartisan backing in other states. He believes the lack of GOP support for the option in Iowa might change in the face of public support.

The GOP has majority control of the Iowa House and Senate, beginning in January. Without Republican support, any bill on the issue cannot advance through the legislative process.

“I’ve not abandoned hope,” said Bolkcom, who plans to reintroduce a bill for the option in next year’s Legislature.

Bowen, of Iowa Right to Life, says her group is beefing up its opposition despite Republican control. She cited GOP lawmakers around the nation who have supported assisted-suicide laws. She believes her group must maintain an aggressive, ongoing educational effort about the issue.

“There may have been a Republican surge on election night, but we saw Colorado that night approve assisted suicide,” Bowen said. “We can’t take anything for granted.”

Tamales, a Tesla and a sunset: How Betsy Davis chose to die

Forty-one-year-old Betsy Davis went through the screening steps with her primary care physician soon after California’s End of Life Option Act took effect on June 9. 

By this time, the neurodegenerative disease known as ALS had robbed her of the ability to walk, lift her arm to her face, or eat and drink without choking. Davis, the focus of a Des Moines Register investigation regarding the complications arising from physician-assisted suicides, dragged her right pinkie across the smooth surface of an iPad to control her TV with what little strength she had left.

“She was done living with ALS,” said her sister, Kelly Davis. “She wanted to put an end to her suffering.”

Betsy’s family was unable to obtain secobarbital, a drug commonly used in physician-assisted suicides but in short supply where Betsy was living. Instead, friends and family devised a plan to make a gelatin concoction to help make the morphine, chloral hydrate and phenobarbital more palatable.

On July 24, about 30 people gathered at Betsy’s rental home in Ojai, Calif., including her three caregivers and her doctor.

After a final dinner of homemade tamales, Betsy was dressed in a ceremonial kimono. (One of her unfulfilled bucket-list items had been to visit Japan.)

She was taken outside and driven in a new Tesla to a favorite spot near a grove of fruit trees and empty horse stables. She was seated on her massage table, which was sheltered by a canopy, and faced west, toward the evening sky.

That’s when one of her friends discovered the Jell-O mix wouldn’t congeal.

“It was kind of like Elmer’s glue,” said Heather Okray, Betsy’s caregiver. “It smelled like it, too. Like a really strong paint smell.”

Most of the assembled group said their final goodbyes before Betsy swallowed the medicine. The doctor stayed to watch.

The massage therapist helped Betsy sit upright and then leaned her back as she drank the glop. Okray helped Betsy with the cup. They stopped just once to wipe her chin and make sure she was taking all of the mixture.

“(Betsy) just totally focused on getting all the medication down as fast as she could,” Kelly said, noting the drink had to be completed in a window of two to eight minutes to quickly end her sister’s life.

“When it got to the point where Heather was just actually going to have to take the cup and hold it for Betsy, that’s when we turned and, like, looked at her doctor,” her sister said. ” ‘What are we supposed to do here? This is going to take too long.’ And the doctor said, ‘Go ahead and hold it for her.’

“What we thought the law said was that Betsy had to take the medication herself. So it was this effort to not — that we weren’t the ones holding the cup. That ended up just slowing down the process. And her doctor said, you know, ‘Go ahead and hold the cup for her; that’s OK.’ Because if she didn’t take all the medication — if she fell asleep before taking all the medication — she would be in a coma for a couple days and wake up. She had to take all of it.”

It took Betsy nearly nine minutes to drink the lethal dose — about a cup and a half of what her sister described as “sludge.”

“As soon she was done, she was out; we just kind of laid her down, and she was out,” Kelly said.

“This,” Kelly said of her sister, “is something that she felt strongly about — being able to have this choice.”

How California will track assisted suicides

Public records don’t yet show whether the complications Betsy Davis and her family experienced with California’s new End of Life Option act are common or a rarity.

Davis, a focus of a Des Moines Register investigation about complications with assisted suicides, was too weak to drink a deadly concoction of drugs without help.

Davis is one of the first to use the state’s assisted suicide law, which went into effect June 9.

The state’s first annual report compiling data on California’s physician-assisted suicides is due July 1. The California Department of Public Health is hiring two employees to manage data tracking for the End of Life Option Act.

That report, similar to those being kept in Oregon and Washington, will contain:

  • The total number of lethal prescriptions written;
  • The number of patients who died from those drugs and the rate of those deaths per 10,000 deaths in California over the same period;
  • The total number of patients with prescriptions who died, regardless of cause of death, with the cause of death listed;
  • The number of patients with prescriptions who died in hospice or a similar palliative care program;
  • The number of physicians who wrote lethal prescriptions;
  • The demographic percentages of those who died from the lethal drugs, according to the following categories: age at death, education level, race, sex, type of insurance (including whether they had insurance) and underlying illness.

California compiles the data through forms submitted by “secure fax or mail.”

Within 30 days of writing a lethal prescription, the attending physician must submit a copy of the patient’s written request, the three-page attending physician checklist and compliance form and the one-page consulting physician compliance form.

Within 30 days of the patient’s death from the lethal drug — or any other cause — the attending physician also must submit the attending physician follow-up form.

The law requires physicians to submit the forms but does not outline penalties if they fail to comply. The Medical Board of California could issue citations and fines to physicians who don’t comply, as well as follow existing California law that would allow it to suspend or revoke licenses, among other professional penalties.

Des Moines Register

January 23, 2017 Trenton Rally for Life and January 27, 2017 Washington, D.C. March for Life

Please note that the Rally for Life in Trenton and the March for Life in Washington, D.C. will take place on different days in 2017.

The Trenton Rally for Life will take place on Monday, January 23, 2017 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  The Rally flyer can be downloaded from the link below.

The Washington D.C. Rally and March for Life will take place on Friday, January 27, 2017. The Rally will take place at noon on the grounds of the Washington Monument, near the corner of 15th Street and Constitution Avenue. Following the Rally, the March will begin on Constitution Avenue between 15th and 17th Streets at approximately 1:00 pm.  For more information onthe 1/27/17 March, visit www.marchforlife.org

Please click here rallyannouncement2017 to download the Flyer for the 1/23 Trenton Rally

We hope to see you at both the Rally in Trenton and the March for Life in Washington, D.C.!rally 2016 photo

Take Action to stop Physician Assisted Suicide poison in NJ!

Update:  The Senate Health Committee released A2451/2474 from Committee on 11/3/16 by a vote of 5-3 with one abstention.  Please take the action listed below immediately!

The full Assembly passed A2451, the Physician Assisted Suicide bill on 10/20/16.

Below is the 10/20/16 Assembly Roll Call Vote on A2451.

Action needed:  Call your state Senator and urge him/her to vote NO on A2451/S2474, Then call Gov Christie and urge him to veto A2451/S2474 if reaches his desk.

Phone # for Governor:  609 292 6000.  You can also take action by clicking on the “legislation” heading from this webpage and taking action on the third item that is titled, “No Assisted Suicide.” Thank you!

Asm.  10/20/2016  –  3RDG FINAL PASSAGE   –  Yes {41}  No {29}  Not Voting {5}  Abstains {5}  –  Roll Call

Andrzejczak, Bob – Yes Auth, Robert – No Barclay, Arthur – Yes
Benson, Daniel R. – Yes Bramnick, Jon M. – No Brown, Chris A. – No
Bucco, Anthony M. – No Burzichelli, John J. – Yes Caputo, Ralph R. – No
Caride, Marlene – Yes Carroll, Michael Patrick – No Chaparro, Annette – Yes
Chiaravalloti, Nicholas – Abstain Ciattarelli, Jack M. – Yes Clifton, Robert D. – No
Conaway, Herb, Jr. – Abstain Coughlin, Craig J. – Yes Dancer, Ronald S. – No
Danielsen, Joe – Yes DeAngelo, Wayne P. – Yes DeCroce, BettyLou – No
DiMaio, John – No Downey, Joann – Yes Egan, Joseph V. – No
Eustace, Tim – Yes Giblin, Thomas P. – Not Voting Gove, DiAnne C. – No
Green, Jerry – Yes Greenwald, Louis D. – Yes Gusciora, Reed – Yes
Handlin, Amy H. – No Holley, Jamel C. – Yes Houghtaling, Eric – Yes
Howarth, Joe – No Jasey, Mila M. – Yes Jimenez, Angelica M. – Yes
Johnson, Gordon M. – Yes Jones, Patricia Egan – Yes Karabinchak, Robert J. – Abstain
Kean, Sean T. – No Kennedy, James J. – Yes Lagana, Joseph A. – Yes
Lampitt, Pamela R. – Yes Land, R. Bruce – Yes Mazzeo, Vincent – Yes
McGuckin, Gregory P. – No McKeon, John F. – Yes McKnight, Angela V. – Yes
Moriarty, Paul D. – Yes Mosquera, Gabriela M. – Yes Mukherji, Raj – Not Voting
Munoz, Nancy F. – No Muoio, Elizabeth Maher – Abstain O’Scanlon, Declan J., Jr. – Yes
Oliver, Sheila Y. – No Peterson, Erik – No Phoebus, Gail – No
Pinkin, Nancy J. – No Pintor Marin, Eliana – Yes Prieto, Vincent – Yes
Quijano, Annette – Yes Rible, David P. – No Rodriguez-Gregg, Maria – Not Voting
Rumana, Scott T. – Not Voting Rumpf, Brian E. – No Russo, David C. – No
Schaer, Gary S. – No Schepisi, Holly – Abstain Singleton, Troy – Yes
Space, Parker – Not Voting Sumter, Shavonda E. – Yes Taliaferro, Adam J. – Yes
Tucker, Cleopatra G. – No Vainieri Huttle, Valerie – Yes Watson, Blonnie R. – No
Webber, Jay – No Wimberly, Benjie E. – Yes Wisniewski, John S. – Yes
Wolfe, David W. – No Zwicker, Andrew – Yes

NJ Attorney General Pursues Case against abortionists Steven Brigham and Vikram Kaji

Attorney general says banned doctor still running Englewood abortion clinic

An abortion doctor who lost his license in New Jersey and has been banned from practicing in other states is illegally exerting control over women’s clinics in Englewood and several other locations, the state attorney general has charged.

Dr. Steven C. Brigham in a 2012 file photo.

AP FILE PHOTO
Dr. Steven C. Brigham in a 2012 file photo.

Additionally, the facility known as Englewood Women’s Services — one of 14 in a chain of clinics that extends to Maryland and Virginia — filed for bankruptcy protection from creditors this week after a federal judge in Maryland three weeks ago awarded $6.5 million to a former patient in a malpractice case.

Dr. Steven C. Brigham, who lost his New Jersey license in November 2014 after illegally performing abortions in Maryland, has been plagued by controversy throughout a career in which he estimated he performed 40,000 abortions — including late-term procedures — even though he never completed a residency in obstetrics or gynecology.

The website for the chain known as American Women’s Services promises low fees, immediate appointments and “private expert care with over 35 years experience.”

After New Jersey revoked Brigham’s license, the state ordered him to divest of all financial interest in the chain of clinics. The physician purported to sign over interests to another doctor who performed abortions at the clinic and then became a medical director after the state suspended Brigham’s license, the state alleges.

“We are arguing that the transfer of ownership was a sham and that through the management services agreement, Brigham is still exerting control over the practice that ought to be exercised by an owner,” said Paul Loriquet, a spokesman for the Attorney General’s Office.

There is no evidence or indication that Brigham “is engaging in any clinical practice,” Loriquet said.

The bankruptcy filing, which seeks Chapter 11 protection, lists “Dr. Steven C. Brighman” of Voorhees as an owner of the company. The Englewood clinic on Grand Avenue is behind $51,847 on rent, and an eviction is pending, according to court documents. Total assets and liabilities are estimated in the filing at no more than $50,000 each.

On Wednesday, the Englewood clinic’s landlord won a default judgment because no one appeared in court to represent the clinic, a court official said.

Hackensack lawyer Donald T. Bonomo, who is representing the Englewood clinic in bankruptcy court in Newark, said that it “will continue to operate” as it reorganizes. He declined to comment on the status of Brigham’s medical license or on clinic managers’ identities or credentials. As the bankruptcy attorney, he is not involved in those matters, he said.

A woman who answered the phone at the Englewood clinic this week identified herself as Skylar Hamilton, a “communications assistant,” and said Brigham was not available.

Joseph M. Gorrell, an attorney representing Brigham before the state Board of Medical Examiners, said Wednesday the physician has appealed the revocation, and oral arguments have not yet been scheduled. Brigham remains on the revoked physician list and owes the state more than $500,000 in fines and other costs, Loriquet said.

Began in South Jersey

Brigham, long accused of botched abortions in more than two dozen years of practice, lost his New Jersey license after questionable practices in Maryland.

He began the abortion process in a South Jersey clinic, then directed women — or had his staff drive them — to a clinic he owned in Maryland where the surgical part of the procedure would be performed. However, he was not licensed to conduct surgeries after the first trimester. In advanced cases, they have to be performed in hospitals and he doesn’t have admitting privileges or special qualifications, like residency training, which is required under New Jersey state law, officials said.

One patient from South Carolina claimed in a 2015 lawsuit against Brigham and others that in 2012 she underwent a failed non-surgical abortion at an American Women’s Services-affiliated clinic in Frederick, Md., resulting in the birth of a child more than 10 weeks premature, with hearing loss, developmental delays, heart defects and other problems.

On Aug. 5, Judge J. Frederick Motz granted the woman a $6.5 million judgment against Brigham and the other defendants.

The recent investigation into the control of the 14 clinics is tied to a complaint New Jersey filed against a physician affiliated with Brigham — Vikram H. Kaji — an 80-year-old board certified obstetrician and gynecologist, who has served as medical director at all clinic locations.

In addition to Englewood, clinics are located in: Elizabeth, Hamilton, Phillipsburg, Galloway, Toms River, Voorhees and Woodbridge in New Jersey. In Maryland, clinics are located in Baltimore, Cheverly, Frederick and Silver Spring.

In Virginia, there’s a clinic in Virginia Beach and Fairfax, but state regulators suspended the license of the Fairfax facility in April after finding a number of problems including unsanitary equipment, expired medication and failure to follow proper care protocols – 52 pages in all.

“The license remains suspended,” said Maribeth Brewster, a spokeswoman for Virginia regulators.

Kaji began working for Brigham as an independent contractor to perform abortions in 1996. In 2010, Kaji took over as medical director at all clinic locations when Brigham’s license was temporarily suspended and he was prohibited from serving in the job, according to the complaint the state filed against Kaji in June 2015.

The board received a stock certificate in March 2015 that purported to show Brigham transferred complete ownership to Kaji as a condition of Brigham’s losing his license. The two physicians also sent a transfer of ownership notice for three of the locations — Elizabeth, Englewood and Hamilton — to the state Department of Health, which registers the facilities, according to state documents.

In May 2015, Kaji testified under oath before a board panel and denied being the owner, according to the state complaint.

Kaji said Brigham continued to fulfill the obligations as owner in all clinic locations in New Jersey and beyond, state documents show. Kaji “expressly testified that ‘there is no other person around, [Brigham’s] the only one who runs the show,’” according to the complaint.

In fact, Kaji during testimony said of the ownership transfer: “It was just a technical paper transaction so the business could go on.”

Kaji “aided and abetted the unlicensed practice of medicine in allowing Brigham to maintain ownership of AWS, a professional service corporation, an activity for which a medical license is required,” the state complaint alleges.

Gorrell, who is also representing Kaji, declined to comment pending a hearing scheduled for Sept. 12 and 13 on the move to suspend Kaji’s license.

‘Cut enough corners’

Brigham has been the subject of many disciplinary hearings in New Jersey and elsewhere over the last two decades. Brigham left Pennsylvania in 1992, agreeing never to practice in the state again, according to a series of stories The Record published in 1994 on a three-state inquiry into the physician.

The agreement was reached after a confidential investigation by the Pennsylvania medical board, but authorities at the time refused to divulge further information. New York and New Jersey had investigated the physician on allegations of malpractice.

In November 1994, New York revoked the physician’s license after two women undergoing late-term abortions were injured, one of whom suffered a perforated uterus and one who bled for hours before being taken to an emergency room. New Jersey was undertaking its own efforts to revoke Brigham’s license, in some instance, citing the same cases, The Record found in 1994.

The attorney general pressed the state board at the time to revoke Brigham’s license, but the board chose to allow hearings to continue.

Two decades later, the New Jersey board revoked Brigham’s license after he practiced medicine in Maryland without a license. The order cited a New Jersey administrative law judge’s findings: After reviewing Brigham’s extensive track record of disciplinary actions in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Florida, the judge noted that “Dr. Brigham has finally cut enough corners.”

An attorney representing Brig­ham said there were 23 times that another doctor performed the surgery, not Brigham himself. He argued that he had a “consultive relationship” that allowed him to practice in Maryland.

**Updated 8/2/16 ** Physician Assisted Suicide Bill (A2451/S2474) Reintroduced in Both Houses. Take Action

stop physician assisted suicide

 

**Updated 8/2/16**

“No matter how much proponents try to portray their support for this misguided bill as compassionate, the reality is that the bill is anything but,” said Marie Tasy, executive director for New Jersey Right to Life. “The legislation is deeply flawed and will place the lives of our most vulnerable populations at risk of misdiagnosis, coercion and abuse.”

Senator Nicholas Scutari (D-22) reintroduced The Senate version of the Physician Assisted Suicide bill (S2474) on August 1, 2016.  According to an article written by Star Ledger reporter Sue Livio,  proponents are pushing for action on the bill by the fall of 2016.  Read the article

 

 

Assemblyman John Burzichelli (D-3) reintroduced the Physician Assisted Suicide Bill (2451) in February of 2016.  The text of the new bill, A2451, is now available on-line, is the identical to the previous version.  We expect the Senate version to be introduced shortly.

Background on NJ Physician Assisted Legislation

The previous bill (A2270/S382) passed the NJ Assembly by one vote on November 13,  2014, but failed to garner enough support in the NJ Senate, and consequently, expired in the last session.  Read the January 12, 2016 Press Release from the Alliance Against Doctor Prescribed Suicide here

11/13/14 State Assembly Vote

To see how your Two Assembly Members voted on November 13, 2014 and for background information on the Assembly legislative process in the last session, please click here

More information on efforts to legalize physician assisted suicide in NJ can be found on our webpages.

Take Action:

If you don’t know who your legislators are, go to the tab on the njrtl webpage marked, “Legislation” and add your 9 digit zip code.  Once you add your 9 digit zip code, click “Go.  A page will open that will provide pictures and names of your federal and state elected officials. (Helpful hint:  you will need to use the scroll bar on the right hand side and scroll down to the bottom of the page to find your State Senator and Two Assembly Members.)

If your Two State Assembly Members voted No previously, please contact them and thank them for their No vote. Urge them to vote No again on A2451/S2474 if it comes up for a vote.

If your Two State Assembly Members Voted Yes, please contact them and tell them you are disappointed in their vote and that you expect them to vote No on A2451/S2474 if it comes up again.

If one or two of your State Assembly members are newly elected, schedule a meeting to speak with them and educate them about the dangers of Bill A2451/S2474.

NJRTL appears as invited guest on CNN Town Hall Mtg with Speaker Paul Ryan, view the video

On July 12, 2016, NJRTL Executive Director was an invited guest Paul Ryanon CNN’s Town Hall Meeting with the Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Paul Ryan. In the segment, Speaker Paul Ryan reiterates his strong pro-life position.   The segment was hosted by Jake Tapper.  You can watch the video by clicking on the link HERE

 

Update: Governor Christie Vetoes bills the Senate and Assembly passed to use your tax dollars to fund the largest abortion provider. Take Action Now!

Defund the horror

 

Update July 1, 2016:  Governor Christie once again vetoes Planned Parenthood funding bills ( A3492/S2277 and A1963/S1017)!

On June 27, both the Senate and Assembly voted in favor of A3492/S2277 and A1963/S1017 to use your hard earned tax dollars to fund Planned Parenthood.

Click here to see how your State Senator and two Assembly members voted

Take Action:

  1.  Please call and email Governor Christie 609 292 6000 and thank him for vetoing these bills.

2.     View the vote tally (link above) to see how your State Senator and 2 Assembly members voted on these bills. Then call and email them. Thank those who voted No and express your outrage to those who voted Yes and tell them you expect them to Vote No on any attempt to override the Governor’s vetoes of these bills and that you also expect them to vote No on any future attempt to fund Planned Parenthood with our tax dollars.  You can send a prewritten email to your legislators from our website by clicking on the tab that says, “Legislation.”  It’s the third item on the page.  Thank you.

Timeline:

Both the Senate & Assembly scheduled two bills for a vote on Monday, June 27th that will use our hard earned tax dollar to fund Planned Parenthood. They are A3492/S2277 and A1963/S1017.  Take action to oppose now! On Thursday, Assembly Dems continually tried to censor the truth about Planned Parenthood. This occurred when NJRTL Exec Dir Marie Tasy attempted to tell the Assembly budget committee why Planned Parenthood should not be funded by taxpayers and was repeatedly and rudely interrupted by the Chair and only given 3 minutes to provide remarks while PP officials were allowed to provide testimony uninterrupted and were even praised and thanked by the Chair. Our comments did not make it into the News coverage even though our written remarks were provided to the press. Please take action on these bills now! Please don’t allow Planned Parenthood’s lobbyists and their bullies in the legislature to censor the truth about Planned Parenthood! Take action now to let your lawmakers know where you stand on this issue!

NJ taxpayers: Take Action to make sure your hard earned money is not used to fund Planned Parenthood!  Call and write your State Senator and Two Assembly Members and tell them to Vote No on A3492/S2277 and A1963/S1017! We plan to publish these votes.  Tell your legislators:  A vote in favor of these bills is a vote to fund the killing of children by the nation’s largest abortion provider.
Take action at the third item on this page:
http://njrtl.org/legislation/

 

Continue reading

See how your State legislators voted on Planned Parenthood funding bills

NJ senate

Please see below for the June 27, 2016 vote tallies on the Planned Parenthood funding bills.

Please note that a  “yes” vote is a vote in favor of forcing taxpayers to fund the largest abortion provider in the nation, Planned Parenthood.  Planned Parenthood is currently the subject of a federal investigation by Congress for selling baby body parts, which is in violation of federal law.  If your State Senator and Assembly members voted for these bills, call them and express your outrage.

Please also contact Governor Christie and urge him to veto these bills.

 

June 27, 2016 Senate and Assembly Vote on A1963/S1017

click here for vote tally:  S1017

 

June 27, 2016 Senate and Assembly Vote on A3492/S2277

click here for vote tally: A3492 Aca